Opinion

Memorial Service for Penny Chenery

By Posted on 1 Comment 3 min read 628 views

Penny Chenery Tribute page at Secretariat.com.

And now, the original post:

First, pardon me while I air out a related matter regarding Penny Chenery.

When American Pharoah took the Triple Crown, NBC Sports flubbed coverage of a special moment in horse racing history.

While Pharoah’s trainer Bob Baffert hurried toward the winners circle, the most famous Triple Crown-winning horse owner still with us stood up from her box seat to welcome Baffert to horse racing’s most exclusive club.

Yes, NBC Sports cut away from a shot of Secretariat’s owner Penny Chenery shaking hands with Bob Baffert after his horse ended the 37-year-long Triple Crown “drought.”

She wasn’t even identified as a well-wisher.

My TV engineer husband, who wasn’t into horse racing when I married him, and I were shocked.

THIS is Saratoga

By Posted on 0 Comments 1 min read 1060 views
Saratoga Selfie
After a misty morning at the track side breakfast, a full day of racing is ahead. And, tis true: no hat and no fancy clothes. Sorry to disappoint.

I made one trip this summer to the races at Saratoga, with friends to the Whitney Handicap.

Also, as y’all know, I’m campaigning via social media to win the Backstretch Tour package for the 2017 Breeder’s Cup in DelMar in the #BCSweepstakes. The contest sponsor helpfully provides ready-made video and tweets we can post.

This is one of them:

Horses in Heaven for Sam Shepard

By Posted on 0 Comments 2 min read 998 views

The only video I could find of Sam Shepard with a horse is this scene from the movie “Ruffian,” portraying her maiden race, in which Shepard plays her trainer Frank Whiteley.

Thoughts of Sam Shepard may be more of theater, space exploration, and passionate family drama — less like a Norman Rockwell painting but more like Anakin Skywalker’s family.

But Shepard was a horseman, too. A former hot walker, rodeo rider, team roper, polo player, and breeder of race horses.

Serendipity and the Saddle Box

By Posted on 0 Comments 4 min read 547 views

Businesses often pitch me to post on this blog. I turn down most requests. Others, especially if the email pitch feels “boilerplate,” I ignore.

The owner of a family-owned company offered me a free Saddle Box via email. If I wanted a free box, business owner Phil Van Treuren said, I could send him my postal address. Phil said nothing about being on the blog, nor mentioned “free for an honest review,” but obviously his inquiry arrived because of this blog.

Googling Saddle Box and browsing the site told me Saddle Box is a curated collection of equestrian-themed sample goodies designed for and delivered by subscription. It’s a family-owned and run business complete with photos of the Van Treurens on the website.

Subscription business models like this one are based on the idea of a company selling a product or service while receiving monthly or yearly recurring subscription revenue. These types of business models focus on customer retention over customer acquisition. Essentially, subscription business models focus on the way revenue is made so that a single customer pays multiple payments for prolonged access to goods or services.

In recent years, more companies seem to be moving from a business revenue model where revenue is made from one-time purchases to subscriptions model where revenue is made on a recurring basis in return for consistent access to the delivery of goods or services.

You can learn more about how digital ecommerce businesses are making use of recurring payment business models by checking out some of the resources on the FastSpring website.

Anyway, I liked what I saw but wondered what I’d do with whatever came in the box. Once a week, I ride school horses, someone else’s horses. I already invest in lessons, fly spray, peppermints, cooling shirts, and various items of equestrian apparel.

Then, I decided to keep what I wanted and give the rest of the box to my riding instructor Christine.

Meanwhile, back at the barn

Royal Ascot on TV: Comments on the Coverage

By Posted on 1 Comment 4 min read 1331 views

Featured in the telecast was this custom Royal Ascot globe made by Bellerby & Co. The broadcast featured a story about the making of this globe, plus images of the Royal Ascot globe were used for transitions between the program, a.k.a., “bumps.”

In Summer 2017, NBC Sports aired horse racing live from Royal Ascot for the first time. With announcer/TV presenter Nick Luck fronting the American-ized version, most of the action was covered by ITV, which did a wonderful job.

I hope y’all at NBC were taking notes on the production, especially for Kentucky Derby coverage.